Feb 6 2012

“What happened to Gracie’s eggs?!”

… That’s what the woman standing in front of me urgently wanted to know.

Sheila Deane explaining the significance of Gracie's eggs to a rapt audience at the National Arts Centre

I was as delighted with her question as she had been with Sheila Deane’s essay, “Kick the Can” — even though I’d only read a brief excerpt from it, along with sections from a few others, and my own at the BC Truck Loggers Convention Ladies Luncheon taking place recently in (unusually) snowy Victoria.

Equally gratifying was the experience of reading “My Last Erotic Poem”, Lorna Crozier’s contribution to the collection. I had to pause for laughter after EVERY SINGLE LINE.

Not surprisingly, all of the books I’d brought to the event were snapped up by eager readers, and the organizer said to me afterwards that the stories I read and told from I Feel Great About My Hands resonated so well with the diverse group of woman (ages 30 to 70)that they probably should have skipped the fashion show component and just given me more time to talk about the book.

The assembled audience’s engagement extended to the project it’s helping to support: Although I only spoke briefly about Informed Opinions, which receives a 10% royalty from every book sold, when I ran out of copies, two of the women still in line to purchase  one handed me their $20 bills and said, “We’d like to donate these to the project.”

Apparently the complementariness of the two goes both ways: recently after I delivered a half-day Informed Opinions workshop to some quick studies at the Canadian Nurses Association in Ottawa, one of the participants ordered three copies, just on the basis of a promotional postcard featuring all of the contributors’ names. (Because they’re an interesting and impressive bunch!)

As for the answer to the question above? All I can tell you is that if you want to learn what happened to Gracie’s eggs, and what they had to do with the benefits of aging, you’ll just have to buy the book! (Fortunately, it’s still widely available.)

And if I can’t make it to your luncheon or book club meeting to read a funny or inspirational excerpt or two, one of the other contributors may well be available!

 


May 11 2011

Poultry inspires surprising insights


Different Drummer Books in Burlington played host yesterday to two of the contributors to I Feel Great About My Hands, Sheila Deane (above) and author Lyndsay Green (below). The two met for the first time at the collection’s Ottawa launch last month and bonded there and at the Toronto event over their shared literary references to poultry. (What can I say – true artists find inspiration in the every day and these women are talented enough to fashion insight from the unlikeliest sources.)

For Sheila it was a menopausal chicken; for Lyndsay, it was the unfortunate nickname applied by her daughters to the undersides of her arms.When the two read recently at the National Arts Centre’s Fourth Stage, and then again in Toronto at Ben McNally’s, hilarity ensued. I wish you’d been there.

But if you weren’t, their poignant pieces, full of unique yet relatable moments, are available in the book.